Detecting Micro-seismicity and Long-duration Tremor-like Events from the Oklahoma Wavefield Experiment

Zhigang Peng, Chenyu Li, Zefeng Li, Chengyuan Zhang, & Nori Nakata

Submitted August 15, 2017, SCEC Contribution #7871, 2017 SCEC Annual Meeting Poster #023

Oklahoma has experienced abrupt increase of induced seismicity in the last decade. An important way to fully understand seismic activities in Oklahoma is to obtain more complete earthquake catalogs and detect different types of seismic events. The IRIS Community Wavefield Demonstration Experiment was deployed near Enid, Oklahoma in Summer of 2016. The dataset from this ultra-dense array provides an excellent opportunity for detecting microseismicity in that region with wavefield approaches. Here we examine continuous waveforms recorded by 3 seismic lines using local coherence for ultra-dense arrays (Li et al., 2017), which is a measure of cross-correlation of waveform at each station with its nearby stations. So far we have detected more than 5,000 events from 06/22/2016 to 07/20/2016, and majority of them are not listed on the regional catalog of Oklahoma or global catalogs, indicating that they are local events. We also identify 15-20 long-period long-duration events, some of them lasting for more than 500 s. Such events have been found at major plate-boundary faults (also known as deep tectonic tremor), as well as during hydraulic fracturing, slow-moving landslides and glaciers. Our next step is to locate these possible tremor-like events with their relative arrival times across the array and compare their occurrence times with solid-earth tides and injection histories to better understand their driving mechanisms.

Key Words
Induced earthquakes, Oklahoma

Citation
Peng, Z., Li, C., Li, Z., Zhang, C., & Nakata, N. (2017, 08). Detecting Micro-seismicity and Long-duration Tremor-like Events from the Oklahoma Wavefield Experiment. Poster Presentation at 2017 SCEC Annual Meeting.


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